Tag Archives: treasure

Blog Hop #Giveaways & Release Party

NAUGHTY AFTER DARK BLOG HOP

I’ll be giving away an ARC of THE CLAIMED and a LOST T-shirt to one lucky winner! Just tweet or share this comment on Twitter or Facebook.

The Jersey Shore like you can’t imagine-THE CLAIMED #paranormal #romance May 2012 PLZ RT http://awe.sm/5fSef

Many thanks to Close Encounters with the Night Kind Blog and Natasha Blackthorne for organizing this blog hop.



NOCTURNAL WHISPERS RELEASE PARTY

Don’t forget about the NOCTURNAL WHISPERS Release Party – Feb 1 to Feb 29! Many thanks to those of you who have already downloaded NOCTURNAL WHISPERS and those who have agreed to review it!

To celebrate the release, we’re going to be having a month long release contest. To be eligible to win a $25 Gift card, copies of AZTEC GOLD and THE FIFTH KINGDOM plus a LOST T-shirt and an awesome tote bag, just click here!

NOCTURNAL WHISPERS Excerpt

In case you can’t see the excerpt below, you can cut and past this link:
http://www.scribd.com/fullscreen/77896155?access_key=key-weo9sowk2o2b574axao

Nocturnal Whispers Erotic Paranormal Romance Excerpt

Kiss Me, Kill Me – It’s All About Location!

When working with a location in your novel, it’s important to keep in mind a number of things:

1. The tone of the book: Where you set your novel can have an obvious impact on the overall atmosphere of the work. A centuries-old inn on a rocky and foggy New England coast may be better for establishing a gothic feel than the glittering streets of Miami. On the other hand, setting a novel in an unexpected locale, like Miami for a vampire story, may be provide novel ways for you to expand a mythology or create an alternate world.

2. Roadways and the native lingo: My husband just finished a book and said to me that it was obvious the writer was not a New Yorker, although apparently the main character in the book was supposed to be a New Yorker. How did hubby know that? The writer made references to roadways in a manner in which natives would not. For example, a reference to 95 when coming off the George Washington Bridge (aka the “GW” to a native). While it may be 95 on the map, most natives would equate that road with heading to the Turnpike (aka the New Jersey Turnpike). Another one to watch out for if you’re writing about New York City (aka Manhattan), Avenue of the Americas is the official name for 6th Avenue, but it’s rare for a New Yorker to call it Avenue of the Americas.

3. Foods: Food can add a great deal of color to your novel. For example, a reference to “tomato pie” would be appropriate for certain settings in New Jersey. What’s “tomato pie” you wonder? It’s a type of pizza and common in many areas (but not in New York City where it’s not common to refer to “pizza” as “tomato pie”). The reference is more common along the Jersey Shore and in Trenton, which is famous for its “tomatoe pie”. In the shore and Trenton areas, “tomato pie” is usually a thin crust pizza where the cheese goes on first and then the sauce.

4. Media attention: It sounds sanguine, but deciding where to set your story may help with getting media attention for your work. A local author setting a novel in a hometown location: Perfect for getting the attention of the local newspaper, community groups, etc. and setting up signings.

5. Local Customs and Superstitions: When choosing a location (or creating your own), are there any local customs or superstitions that you can include? A haunted house or site of buried treasure? A tale about the town’s founding or history? For example, while researching the area of the Jersey Shore where I’ve set SINS OF THE FLESH and STRONGER THAN SIN, I discovered that Captain Kidd anchored off what is now known as Sylvan Lake in Bradley Beach and buried part of his treasure between two trees near what is now known as Brinley Avenue. You can bet that will make it’s way into a book someday!

I hope these things help you with choosing and working with the location in your novel.

Tuesday Tip – Garage Sales

garagaThey say one man’s junk is another man’s treasure and those words were never more true when it comes to garage sales.

I love garage sales, especially those town-wide ones where you can hit dozens in one day. We’ve been spending some time at the beach which means new requirements in our lives. Beach-style bikes. A rollie thing to carry all the chairs and cooler down to the beach.

Luckily, we were able to hit two neighborhood-wide garage sales and within two weeks, we had our rollie thing for $10 and a pair of bikes for $11. Of course, the bikes needed a little work and that cost a little bit more money, but when we were done, we had new comfortable bikes for less than $50.

In today’s economy, saving those few dollars is a big thing. Of course, you should be careful of what you buy at garage sales. For example, baby carriers and other safety items, even if only a few years old, may no longer comply with current safety regulations.

Garage sales are also a good way to encourage your kids to get rid of unwanted stuff. We started having our daughter do a sale every six months. She totally handled all the sales, which was a good way of learning to deal with money and meeting people (with parents hovering nearby of course). She kept a part of the sales money, a part of it went to a charity and any leftover items which were still in good shape went to a local church thrift store to help them raise money.

How can you know when there’s garage sales or advertise one of your own? Believe it or not, there’s a bunch of sites on the ‘Net to help you! Here are links to some of the sites:

Also check out your local newspapers for ads for the sales.

Of course, besides saving money, who doesn’t imagine buying that dusty old painting or unusual book that will turn out to be worth quite a lot of money. I love watching Antiques Roadshow and hearing someone say they bought it at a yard sale for a dollar and it’s worth several thousand!

So, take a break from your busy lives and find a yard sale, stroll around and enjoy the sights of a new town (or even your own town) and maybe find something useful in someone else’s junk!